DIY NATIVE AMERICAN BELT part I

DIY Native American Belt Part 1 | Motte's Blog

It's July Fourth! To all of those celebrating, party on! To everyone else, have a spectacular weekend!

Whatever you're up to, I hope you're not dying from the heat... In case you are though, check out my instant frozen yogurt recipe. You probably have all of the ingredients lying around anyway and it is the perfect treat for any summer picnic!

I know I will be having loads of it this weekend...

But let's draw our attention to this weekend's craft.

Since it is Independence Day, I decided to dig out photos of a project I took in July last year (!) that I have been wanting to share with you for a long time (but clearly haven't gotten round to), and which is deeply connected to America's history.

For this project it was my brother who dug out, or rather, stumbled upon this Native American beaded belt. I don't quite remember where we got it, but I have the sneaky feeling it is in fact a children's belt.

Pretty darn sure actually.

DIY Native American Belt Part 1 | Motte's Blog

DIY Native American Belt Part 1 | Motte's Blog

If my brother holds his breath he can juuust fit it around his waist...

Which is quite impressive actually.

I have noticed that many people have started wearing belts again, men and women alike. It's  not so much about wearing them though, as much as showing them off. Belts are not something you simply wear under your sweater to keep your pants up anymore. They are accessories as much as earrings or statement necklaces are too.

DIY Native American Belt Part 1 | Motte's Blog

You can get them in different styles, colors and textures; many are adorned with intricate or also less ambitious designs, but either way, belts are fashionable.

And something I like to do is recreate or reinterpret items; create my own, personalized version of something that already exists. Like this tiny belt for example.

So why not make a manly version to show off your national pride?

Well, little brother, challenge accepted.

DIY Native American Belt Part 1 | Motte's Blog

DIY Native American Belt Part 1 | Motte's Blog

DIY Native American Belt Part 1 | Motte's Blog

(May I just point out how lucky my brother is to have a big sis who spends her spare time struggling with leather needles and bloody fingers to improve his patriotic summer outfit?!)

(... just sayin'.)

(Actually, I'm not just sayin'. I deserve a hug. At the very least.)

(More like a gold medal. The "Sister of the Year" award including a year's supply of brotherly kisses and a 10,000 dollar prize.)

(Just sayin'.)

DIY Native American Belt Part 1 | Motte's Blog

DIY Native American Belt Part 1 | Motte's Blog

WHAT YOU'LL NEED:
Part I:
beading loom
beading thread (0.20mm)
(sewing) needle
seed beads (five colors, 2,6mm, 1 tub each)
tape
toothpick
super glue

Part II:
leather belt
(leather) cord (5m)
drill
leather needle
(sewing) needle
beading thread
(thimble)
clothes pins
pencil
measuring tape/ruler
tape

DIY Native American Belt Part 1 | Motte's Blog

DIY Native American Belt Part 1 | Motte's Blog

To start off, I drew out my design for the beaded band using the grid of a squared paper.
I opted for five colors: gray as the base color, black, brown, turquoise, yellow.

As a guide, the beaded band ended up having the following measurements:
9 beads in a row (approx. 2cm)
207 rows (approx. 58cm)

DIY Native American Belt Part 1 | Motte's Blog

DIY Native American Belt Part 1 | Motte's Blog

DIY Native American Belt Part 1 | Motte's Blog

DIY Native American Belt Part 1 | Motte's Blog

Thread the beading loom according to the instructions that come in the box or follow instructions below: Cut 10 lengths of thread (one length of thread more than the number of beads in a row). Each length should be two feet longer than the design.

Knot threads at one end, trim of excess close to the base of the knot.
Place the knot under the nailhead seperating the threads into two equal halves. Turn the spool winding the thread onto the spool until approx. 20cm of thread is left.
Knot the loose threads on the opposite side and place seperate thread bundle halves under the second nailhead. Turn this spool also, until threads are held firmly in place. If neccesary, tape down the knots onto the nailheads for extra security.

Place each thread into a seperate groove of the separator bar. Use a toothpick for help. Retighten spools.

DIY Native American Belt Part 1 | Motte's Blog

Place the loom in front of you with the spool end with the least amount of thread close to you. Thread the needle and cut a 90cm length of beading thread. Knot the end of the thread to the left loom thread.

Pick up the beads of the first row with the needle in the correct order left to right to match your design. Keep the beading thread under the loom threads and lift the beads up against loom threads. Each bead should be placed between two loom threads locking beads in place.

On opposite side of loom, pull thread over the loom threads and pull needle through each bead hole. Pull thread tight.

DIY Native American Belt Part 1 | Motte's Blog

If you run out of beading thread, knot and weave old thread through beads to hide the knot. Add a new piece of thread by running it through several beads in the last row. Knot it to the last loom thread and continue beading as before.

DIY Native American Belt Part 1 | Motte's Blog

DIY Native American Belt Part 1 | Motte's Blog

Keep each row straight and tight against adjoining rows.

To finish, release each loom thread at a time, knotting and threading through several beads to hide the knot. Optionally, place a dollop of glue onto each knot.

DIY Native American Belt Part 1 | Motte's Blog

DIY Native American Belt Part 1 | Motte's Blog

DIY Native American Belt Part 1 | Motte's Blog

DIY Native American Belt Part 1 | Motte's Blog

DIY Native American Belt Part 1 | Motte's Blog

Head on over to part II to see how I fixated the beadwork onto the belt...

5 comments

  1. I totally love that Indian style! Always stick to your roots!
    Can you make me one of those belts, too?
    xx
    Sarah

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. haha thank you! I was thinking about making one that looks a little more feminine, will have to do that next then I guess :)

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  2. Include me as well love the colors style brunettee@yahoo.com :D

    ReplyDelete
  3. how do you get the pattern for native bead work

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I've added images of my design above, but you can make your own of course!

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